Movies

15 titles found


  • The 1870s among new settlers and outlaws, Danish immigrant Jon (Mads Mikkelsen) has been waiting for years to bring his wife and son to the United States. When he finally succeeds, moments after their arrival they fall victim to a horrific crime. Out of grief and despair Jon kills the perpetrator. His actions unleash powerful forces. His victim’s brother is the ruthless Colonel Delarue who terrorises the town of Black Creek and will stop at nothing to avenge his brother. Betrayed and ostracised by the community, Jon must transform himself from peaceful settler to fearless warrior to save the town and find peace.

  • Everyone in 1880s America knows Jesse James. He’s the nation’s most notorious criminal, hunted by the law in 10 states. He’s also the land’s greatest hero, lauded as a Robin Hood by the public. Robert Ford, meanwhile, is a nobody. 

    That, however, isn’t something the ambitious 19-year-old will settle for. He’ll befriend Jesse, join his gang and gain his confidence, and eventually become his downfall. Friendship turns to rivalry and the quest for fame becomes obsession in this gripping epic produced by Ridley Scott, examining the last days of America’s most famous outlaw, and featuring outstanding performances by Brad Pitt and Casey Affleck.

  • Kevin Costner plays the most famous lawman ever to stride the Wild West. In a gritty, complex portrayal hailed as a “classic American performance” (Bob Campbell, Newhouse Newspapers), Academy Award® winner.

    Costner plays the man who became a myth in an epic, action-filled saga directed and co-written by Lawrence Kasdan. Gene Hackman as Wyatt’s iron-willed father and Dennis Quaid as Earp’s deadly best friend, Doc Holliday, add power to this hard-hitting Western. From Wichita to Dodge City to the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona, Wyatt Earp is a thrilling journey of romance, adventure and mythic courage.

  • Clint Eastwood’s film Unforgiven is an exciting modern classic that rode off with four 1992 Academy Awards®, including Best Picture and Director. "The movie summarized everything I feel about the Western," Eastwood told the Los Angeles Times. "The moral is the concern with gunplay."

    Eastwood and Morgan Freeman play retired, down-on-their-luck outlaws who pick up their guns one last time to collect a bounty offered by the vengeful prostitutes of the remote Wyoming town of Big Whiskey. Richard Harris is an ill-fated interloper, a colourful killer-for-hire called English Bob, and Best Supporting Actor Oscar® winner Gene Hackman is the sly and brutal local sheriff whose brand of law enforcement ranges from unconventional to ruthless. Big trouble is coming to Big Whiskey. And Unforgiven is "a Western for the ages" (Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times).

  • Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland and Lou Diamond Phillips return to the Wild West in the thrilling sequel Young Guns II . This time Billy The Kid and his gang are "wanted men" with the law hot on their tail. When Doc (Sutherland) and Chavez (Phillips) are captured, Billy has to perform a daring escape, sending all three into Mexico to lay low. But laying low is a luxury rarely afforded in the old west; for now the gang has a legendary bounty hunter on their trail and a large reward out for their capture...dead or alive.

  • In Pale Rider, Clint Eastwood returned to the saddle after nine years – and Western movies rode high again. Here the star/director crafted an exciting film in the suspenseful tradition of Shane and High Noon. 

    After corporate mining boss Coy LaHood (Richard Dysart) begins a terror campaign to drive independent pan miners out of the area, a stranger called Preacher (Eastwood) rides into the underdogs’ camp. He becomes their avenger. The tycoon then hires a badge-wearing killer (John Russell) and his duster-shrouded deputies, men loyal to whomever pays the most. LaHood pays in gold. But in a climactic shootout to remember, Preacher pays in lead.

  • Clint Eastwood stars in and directs this sweet comedy about the cowboy impresario of a seedy Wild West show and the stranded Park Avenue heiress he rescues.

    The Wild West has been tamed, leaving no place for a group of romantic roustabouts except their small traveling show... A desperate heiress, who has been left stranded by her con-artist husband, will do anything for a ride to the next town, even allow a blindfolded Bronco Billy throw knives at her for a scant audience. So begins a tumultuous relationship and roller coaster adventure.

  • As The Outlaw Josey Wales, Clint Eastwood is ideally cast as a hard-hitting, fast-drawing loner, recalling his “Man with No Name” from his European Westerns. But unlike that other mythical outlaw, Josey Wales has a name – and a heart.  

    After avenging his family’s brutal murder, Wales is on the run, pursued by a pack of killers. He travels alone, but a ragtag group of outcasts (including Sondra Locke and Chief Dan George) is drawn to him – and Wales can’t leave his motley surrogate family unprotected. Time called it one of 1976’s best movies. Over time, The Outlaw Josey Wales has secured a place as one of top westerns ever.

  • They are fast friends and worse foes. One is Billy the Kid (Kris Kristofferson), a law unto himself. The other is the law: Sheriff Pat Garrett (James Coburn), who once rode with Billy. 

    Set to a bristling score by Bob Dylan (who also plays Billy’s sidekick Alias) and with a Who’s Who of iconic Western players, Sam Peckinpah’s saga of one of the West’s great legends is now restored to its intended glory. For the first time since it left the cutting room, the film has the balance of action and character development Peckinpah wanted, a mix of fury and elegy based on the director’s notes and the insights of colleagues. The difference is profound, as different as an untouched target and a bull’s-eye.

  • Presbyterian Church is a small mining town in the turn-of-the century Pacific Northwest – and a perfect place where gambler John Q. McCabe and bordello madam Constance Miller can do business.  

    Robert Altman’s dazzlingly original McCabe & Mrs. Miller, starring Warren Beatty and Julie Christie (a 1971 Best Actress Academy Award® nominee for her work here), stands the mythology of the Old West on its ear. Shot on beautiful Vancouver wilderness locations, it captures the essence of a long-ago time, coupled with the edgy modern sensibility Altman brought to his other ’70s masterworks M*A*S*H and Nashville. The spellbinding result, critic Pauline Kael wrote, is “a modern classic.”