Movies

229 titles found


  • Before the night is out, the star witness for an important trial lies dying and Detective Frank Bullitt (Steve McQueen) won’t rest until the shooters – and the kingpin behind them – are nailed. 

    From the opening shot to the closing shootout, Bullitt crackles with authenticity: San Francisco locations, crisp dialogue and to-the-letter police, hospital and morgue procedures. An Oscar® winner for Best Film Editing (1969), this edgy thriller features on of cinema history’s most memorable car chases. Buckle up for the unbeatable action.

  • His crime: nonconformity. His sentence: the chain gang. Paul Newman plays one of his best-loved roles as Cool Hand Luke, the loner who won’t – or can’t – bend to the arbitrary rules of his captivity. 

    A cast of fine character actors, including George Kennedy in his Oscar® - winning role of dragline and the indelible Jo Van Fleet as Luke’s mother, give Newman solid support. And Strother Martin is the Captain who taunts Luke with the now-legendary line, “What we’ve got here is.. failure to communicate.” No failure here. With rich humour and vibrant storytelling power, Cool Hand Luke succeeds resoundingly.

  • They are convicts, psychos, lunkheads, losers – and champs at the box office and in movie lore. Decades after it burst onto the scene, The Dirty Dozen remains a milestone among ensemble action flicks. Lee Marvin portrays a tough-as-nails major volunteered in the Army way to command a squad of misfits on a suicide mission against Nazi brass. 

    Charles Bronson, Jim Brown, John Cassavetes, Trini Lopez, Telly Savalas, Donald Sutherland and Clint Walker are among the 12 jailbirds who will earn their freedom if they survive. And Robert Aldrich (The Longest Yard) directs, blending anti-authority gibes with explosive excitement. Nominated for four Academy Awards® The Dirty Dozen won for Best Sound Effects.

  • Professional photographer Thomas saw nothing. And he saw everything. Enlargements of pictures he secretly took of a romantic couple in the park reveal a murder in progress. Or do they? 

    Winner of 1966 Best Picture and Director Awards from the then-new National Society of Film Critics, Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-up is an influential, stylish study of paranoid intrigue and disorientation. It is also a time capsule of mod London, a mindscape of the era’s fashions, free love, parties, music (Herbie Hancock wrote the score and The Yardbirds riff at a club) and hip langour. David Hemmings plays the jaded photographer enlivened by the mystery in his photos. Vanessa Redgrave is the elusive woman pictured in them. And the enigma of what you see, what you don’t see and what the camera sees is yours to solve.

  • Deanie (Natalie Wood in an Oscar®-nominated* performance that marked a career turning point toward complex adult roles) is a teenager eager to do what’s right in her 1920s Kansas town. But the emotions she shares with boyfriend Bud (Warren Beatty’s screen debut) are too strong. 

    Soon the conflict between respectable behaviour and human desire will push Bud to physical collapse. And Deanie to madness. Director Elia Kazan encouraged Pulitzer Prize winner William Inge (Bus Stop, Picnic) to turn a true story he heard during his Midwest youth into an Academy Award®-winning* script. The result, Splendour in the Grass, remains as poetic, penetrating and powerful today as it was two generations ago.

  • "I’m not living with you," Maggie snaps at Brick. “We occupy the same cage, that’s all.” The raw emotions and crackling dialogue of Tennessee Williams’ 1955 Pulitzer Prize-winning play rumble like a thunderstorm in this film version whose fiery performances and grown-up themes made it a box-office hit.

    Paul Newman earned his first Oscar® nomination for his nuanced portrayal of troubled former sports hero Brick. Capturing her second, Elizabeth Taylor makes Maggie the Cat, digging her claws in and holding onto life not as it is , but as she hopes it someday will be, a vivid portrait of passionate loyalty.

  • A Streetcar Named Desire: The Original Director’s Version is the Elia Kazan/ Tennessee Williams film moviegoers would have seen had not Legion of Decency censorship occurred at the last minute. 

    It features three minutes of previously unseen footage underscoring, among other things, the sexual tension between Blanche DuBois (Vivien Leigh) and Stanley Kowalski (Marlon Brando), and Stella Kowalski’s (Kim Hunter) passion for husband Stanley. Catch all of the classic — nominated for 12 Academy Awards® including Best Picture and winner of 4* — that introduced a new era of filmmaking. Step aboard this Streetcar.

  • As a psychotic thug devoted to his hard-boiled ma, James Cagney - older, scarier and just as electrifying - gives a performance to match his work in The Public Enemy as White Heat's cold-blooded Cody Jarrett. Bracingly directed by Raoul Walsh, this fast-paced thriller tracing Jarrett's violent life in and out of jail is also a harrowing character study. Jarrett is a psychological time bomb ruled by impulse. he murders a wounded accomplice and revels in the act. He neglects his sultry wife (Virginia Mayo) and adores his doting mother. It is among the most vivid screen performances of Cagney's career, and the excitement it generates will put you on top of the world!