Search results for: wendell pierce

8 titles found


  • From David Simon, creator of The Wire and Generation Kill, and Eric Overmyer, writer- producer of Homicide and Law & Order, the debut series Treme is set in post-Katrina New Orleans, chronicling the rebuilding of a unique American culture after historic devastation. Treme refers to one of New Orleans' oldest neighbourhoods, an historically important source  of African-American music and culture.

    Treme begins in fall 2005, three months after Hurricane Katrina. The drama follows the interconnected stories of several struggling musicians and locals, including Antoine Batiste (Wendell Pierce), a smooth-talking trombonist. His ex-wife and bar owner, LaDonna Batiste-Williams (Khandi Alexander), concerned over the disappearance of her younger brother Daymo, turns to the local civil rights attorney Antoinette "Toni" Bernette (Melissa Leo) for help. Bernette's husband Creighton (John Goodman), a local professor, becomes an outspoken critic of the government's response to the devastation. Steve Zahn plays Davis McAlary, a rebellious local DJ and musician. McAlary's sometimes girlfriend, Chef Janette Desautel (Kim Dickens), struggles to regain momentum for her newly re-opened restaurant.

    Elsewhere in the city, displaced Mardi Gras Indian chief Albert Lambreaux (Clarke Peters) returns to his devastated neighbourhood, determined to rebuild his way of life. His son Delmond a successful jazz musician, is torn between his family in New Orleans and his life in New York. And talented violinist Annie (Lucia Micarelli) and her boyfriend Sonny (Michiel Huisman), are street musicians in the Quarter looking for their big break. The series also features real-life musicians Kermit Ruffins, Elvis Costello, Allen Toussaint, Dr. John and members of the Treme and Rebirth Brass Bands.

    Created by David Simon and Eric Overmyer; Treme is executive produced by David Simon, Nina Kostroff Noble, Eric Overmyer and Carolyn Strauss. David Mills is co-executive producer; Anthony Hemingway is producer. Directed by Agnieszka Holland, Jim McKay, Ernest Dickerson, Anthony Hemingway, Christine Moore, Brad Anderson, Simon Cellan Jones, Dan Attias, the series is written by David Simon, Eric Overmyer, David Mills, George Pelecanos, Lolis Elie and Tom Piazza. Treme's consultants include notable New Orleanians Donald Harrison, Jr., Susan Spicer, Kermit Ruffins, Davis Rogan and Mary Howell.

  • From David Simon, creator of The Wire and Generation Kill, and Eric Overmyer, writer- producer of Homicide and Law & Order, the debut series Treme is set in post-Katrina New Orleans, chronicling the rebuilding of a unique American culture after historic devastation. Treme refers to one of New Orleans' oldest neighbourhoods, an historically important source  of African-American music and culture.

    Treme begins in fall 2005, three months after Hurricane Katrina. The drama follows the interconnected stories of several struggling musicians and locals, including Antoine Batiste (Wendell Pierce), a smooth-talking trombonist. His ex-wife and bar owner, LaDonna Batiste-Williams (Khandi Alexander), concerned over the disappearance of her younger brother Daymo, turns to the local civil rights attorney Antoinette "Toni" Bernette (Melissa Leo) for help. Bernette's husband Creighton (John Goodman), a local professor, becomes an outspoken critic of the government's response to the devastation. Steve Zahn plays Davis McAlary, a rebellious local DJ and musician. McAlary's sometimes girlfriend, Chef Janette Desautel (Kim Dickens), struggles to regain momentum for her newly re-opened restaurant.

    Elsewhere in the city, displaced Mardi Gras Indian chief Albert Lambreaux (Clarke Peters) returns to his devastated neighbourhood, determined to rebuild his way of life. His son Delmond a successful jazz musician, is torn between his family in New Orleans and his life in New York. And talented violinist Annie (Lucia Micarelli) and her boyfriend Sonny (Michiel Huisman), are street musicians in the Quarter looking for their big break. The series also features real-life musicians Kermit Ruffins, Elvis Costello, Allen Toussaint, Dr. John and members of the Treme and Rebirth Brass Bands.

    Created by David Simon and Eric Overmyer; Treme is executive produced by David Simon, Nina Kostroff Noble, Eric Overmyer and Carolyn Strauss. David Mills is co-executive producer; Anthony Hemingway is producer. Directed by Agnieszka Holland, Jim McKay, Ernest Dickerson, Anthony Hemingway, Christine Moore, Brad Anderson, Simon Cellan Jones, Dan Attias, the series is written by David Simon, Eric Overmyer, David Mills, George Pelecanos, Lolis Elie and Tom Piazza. Treme's consultants include notable New Orleanians Donald Harrison, Jr., Susan Spicer, Kermit Ruffins, Davis Rogan and Mary Howell.

  • From David Simon, creator of The Wire and Generation Kill, and Eric Overmyer, writer- producer of Homicide and Law & Order,' the debut series Treme is set in post-Katrina New Orleans, chronicling the rebuilding of a unique American culture after historic devastation. Treme refers to one of New Orleans' oldest neighbourhoods, an historically important source  of African-American music and culture.

    Treme begins in fall 2005, three months after Hurricane Katrina. The drama follows the interconnected stories of several struggling musicians and locals, including Antoine Batiste (Wendell Pierce), a smooth-talking trombonist. His ex-wife and bar owner, LaDonna Batiste-Williams (Khandi Alexander), concerned over the disappearance of her younger brother Daymo, turns to the local civil rights attorney Antoinette "Toni" Bernette (Melissa Leo) for help. Bernette's husband Creighton (John Goodman), a local professor, becomes an outspoken critic of the government's response to the devastation. Steve Zahn plays Davis McAlary, a rebellious local DJ and musician. McAlary's sometimes girlfriend, Chef Janette Desautel (Kim Dickens), struggles to regain momentum for her newly re-opened restaurant.

    Elsewhere in the city, displaced Mardi Gras Indian chief Albert Lambreaux (Clarke Peters) returns to his devastated neighbourhood, determined to rebuild his way of life. His son Delmond a successful jazz musician, is torn between his family in New Orleans and his life in New York. And talented violinist Annie (Lucia Micarelli) and her boyfriend Sonny (Michiel Huisman), are street musicians in the Quarter looking for their big break. The series also features real-life musicians Kermit Ruffins, Elvis Costello, Allen Toussaint, Dr. John and members of the Treme and Rebirth Brass Bands.

    Created by David Simon and Eric Overmyer; Treme is executive produced by David Simon, Nina Kostroff Noble, Eric Overmyer and Carolyn Strauss. David Mills is co-executive producer; Anthony Hemingway is producer. Directed by Agnieszka Holland, Jim McKay, Ernest Dickerson, Anthony Hemingway, Christine Moore, Brad Anderson, Simon Cellan Jones, Dan Attias, the series is written by David Simon, Eric Overmyer, David Mills, George Pelecanos, Lolis Elie and Tom Piazza. Treme's consultants include notable New Orleanians Donald Harrison, Jr., Susan Spicer, Kermit Ruffins, Davis Rogan and Mary Howell.

  • One of television's most critically acclaimed programs, the Peabody Award-winning drama series 'The Wire' continues to challenge viewers with a "cop show" unlike anything on air. The fifth and final season of 'The Wire' centers on the media's role in addressing - or failing to address - the fundamental political, economic and social realities depicted over the course of the series, while also resolving storylines of the numerous characters woven throughout the narrative arc of the show.

  • With the fall of Barksdale and the ascent of young Marlo Stanfield as West Baltimore's drug king, the detail continues to "follow the money" up the political ladder in the midst of a mayoral election that pits the black incumbent, Clarence Royce against an ambitious white councilman, Tommy Carcetti.

    The theme of urban education is explored through four new characters - Michael Lee, Namond Brice, Randy Wagstaff and "Dukie" Weems as they traverse adolescence in the stunted, drug-saturated streets of West Baltimore.

    The world that awaits these boys and the American commitment to equal opportunity are depicted brilliantly in the edgy, all-too-realistic Season 4 of The Wire.

  • Everyone is feeling the heat in Baltimore. As Stringer Bell looks to diversify and Omar looks for revenge, the drug war is a losing campaign.

    Bodies are piling up and a desperate mayor demands to see some victories before Election Day. But the police are running out of ammunition - wiretaps aren't working, and neither are stakeouts or street busts. Can one senior officer's radical reform really make a difference?

  • Barksdale's in jail, but the team is no better off. McNulty has been demoted to harbour patrol, Daniels is in the police archive dungeon, Prez is chafing in the suburbs and Greggs is stuck behind a desk.

    Meanwhile, on the docks of the Baltimore harbour, the rank and file scrounge for work and the union bosses take illegitimate measures to reinvigorate business. But the discovery of 13 dead bodies in a shipping container is about to blow the whole port inside out. While the detail is on ice, a new case begins...

  • In West Baltimore, the narcotics and homicide divisions begrudgingly launch a sprawling investigation at the insistence of a frustrated judge.

    Led by Lt. Daniels, the half-hearted detail focuses on Avon Barksdale and his partner, Stringer Bell, the two men behind a drug operation that reigns in the high-rises. Barksdale and Bell are also responsible for a string of murders - raps they always manage to beat. Despite resistance from up high, the Barksdale investigation will culminate in a complex series of dangerous wiretaps and surveillance.

    Told from the point of view of both the police and their targets, the series captures a universe of subterfuge and surveillance, where easy distinctions between good and evil, and crime and punishment, are challenged at every turn.