Movies

72 titles found


  • Harrison Ford and filmmaker Roman Polanski count thrillers among their best work. Frantic teams, USA Today’s Mike Clark wrote, “an imaginatively cast superstar and the greatest living suspense director in fine form.” Ford plays an American doctor whose wife (Betty Buckley) suddenly vanishes in Paris. 

    To find her, he navigates a puzzling web of language, locale, laissez-faire cops, triplicate-form bureaucrats and a defiant, mysterious waif (Emmanuelle Seigner) who knows more than she tells. “It is the spirit of Hitchcock that reigns here” (Michael Wilmington, Los Angeles Times). And the consummate skill of Polanski and Ford that’s on dazzling display.

  • Ten years in planning, Sergio Leone's epic Once Upon a Time in America portrays 50 years of riveting underworld history and offers rich roles to a remarkable cast. 

    Robert De Niro and James Woods play lifelong Lower East Side pals whose wary partnership unravels in death and mystery. Strong support comes from Tuesday Weld, Joe Pesci, Jennifer Connelly, Elizabeth McGovern and the young actors playing the cenral characters as ghetto kids.

  • Phoenix cop Ben Shockley’s dream of breaking “the big case” has faded over time. His assignment to escort from Las Vegas “a nothing witness for a nothing trial” seems like just another meaningless exercise. Until the fireworks start. 

    Clint Eastwood runs The Gauntlet into an explosive movie embodying its title with a vengeance. The witness is a hardened hooker (Sondra Locke) whom everyone — including Vegas oddsmakers — wants dead. Trapped between both sides of the law, the two must survive an obstacle course of raging gunfire, blazing cars, swooping helicopters, murderous ambushes, crazed bikers and crooked police. Building to a ferocious finale that shoots an armoured bus to smithereens with more than 8,000 bullets, The Gauntlet is a trip you can’t miss.

  • When Detective Harry Callahan stops a liquor store hostage standoff in his own no-nonsense way, he gets busted back to personnel. But not for long. When terrorists rob an arms warehouse and go on a bloody extortion spree, San Francisco’s leaders quickly seek out Callahan – The Enforcer.

    Clint Eastwood returns for his third Callahan caper, joined this time by a new partner, Tyne Daly as Inspector Kate Moore, who has two jobs: tracking down the terrorists – and winning Harry’s confidence. Stoked with brisk humour, hard-hitting mayhem and the high-impact team of Eastwood and Daly, this exciting outing carves another winning notch in the handle of Harry’s .44 magnum.

  • On a hot Brooklyn afternoon, two optimistic nobodies set out to rob a bank. Sonny (Al Pacino) is the mastermind, Sal (John Cazale) is the follower and disaster is the result. Because the cops, crowds, TV cameras and even the pizza man have arrived. 

    Pacino and director Sidney Lumet (collaborators on Serpico) reteam for this boisterous comedy thriller that earned six Academy Award® nominations (including Best Picture) and won an Oscar® for Frank Pierson’s streetwise screenplay.

  • Celebrate martial arts legend Bruce Lee’s final film. Sent to an exotic island by his government, a spy (Lee) competes in a deadly tournament by day and infiltrates a ruthless crime lord’s illegal drug operation by night. 

    With plot twists, exquisite cinematography and bone – crushing fight scenes choreographed by Lee himself. Enter the Dragon remains cinema’s most influential martial arts action film.

  • Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty and Ronny Cox play “weekend warriors” who set off in two canoes down a mystery-laden Georgia river – and discover a wilderness of terror. Director John Boorman (Excalibur, Hope and Glory) sets them – and viewers – on the knife-edge of survival. 

    Adapted by James Dickey from his novel and nominated for three Academy Awards® including Best Picture, this “absolutely first-rate piece of moviemaking” (Charles Champlin, Los Angeles Times) draws us in with the irresistible force of a raging current.

  • Before the night is out, the star witness for an important trial lies dying and Detective Frank Bullitt (Steve McQueen) won’t rest until the shooters – and the kingpin behind them – are nailed. 

    From the opening shot to the closing shootout, Bullitt crackles with authenticity: San Francisco locations, crisp dialogue and to-the-letter police, hospital and morgue procedures. An Oscar® winner for Best Film Editing (1969), this edgy thriller features on of cinema history’s most memorable car chases. Buckle up for the unbeatable action.

  • Professional photographer Thomas saw nothing. And he saw everything. Enlargements of pictures he secretly took of a romantic couple in the park reveal a murder in progress. Or do they? 

    Winner of 1966 Best Picture and Director Awards from the then-new National Society of Film Critics, Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-up is an influential, stylish study of paranoid intrigue and disorientation. It is also a time capsule of mod London, a mindscape of the era’s fashions, free love, parties, music (Herbie Hancock wrote the score and The Yardbirds riff at a club) and hip langour. David Hemmings plays the jaded photographer enlivened by the mystery in his photos. Vanessa Redgrave is the elusive woman pictured in them. And the enigma of what you see, what you don’t see and what the camera sees is yours to solve.