Movies

130 titles found


  • Greenkeeper Carl Spackler is about to start World War III – against a gopher. Pompous Judge Smails plays to win but his nubile niece Lacey Underall wants to score her own way. Playboy Ty Webb shoots perfect golf by becoming the ball. And country club loud-mouth Al Czervik just doubled a $20,000 bet on a 10 foot putt. Insanity? No. Caddyshack. 

    Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Bill Murray and Ted Knight tee off for a side-splitting round of fairway foolishness that does for golf what National Lampoon’s Animal House did for fraternities and Police Academy did for law enforcement. With hitmaker Harold Ramis (National Lampoon’s Vacation, Groundhog Day) in the director’s chair, the virtuoso comic skills of all four blend into a riotous hole-in-one for comedy fans. In Caddyshack, the term “golf nut” takes on a deranged double meaning – and nonstop laughter is par for the course!

  • On a laughter scale, Blake Edwards’s 10, a spicy comedy of manners, morals and mid-life crises, hits the top. It’s a film of many moods, sometimes sexy, sometimes thoughtful, sometimes slapstick – but always on target. That target is 42-year old composer George Webber (Dudley Moore), a man who has everything and who may just chuck it all in an obsessive quest for a beautiful woman (Bo Derek) he glimpses en route to her wedding.

  • No matter what rolled in on the tides of time, California surfing buddies Matt, Jack and Leroy knew they’d stick together. And that they’d be ready when a rare 20 -foot swell hit the coast at last. 

    Big Wednesday celebrates surfing as much as the most dedicated kid who ever waxed a board. It’s also a fascinating 1962-1974 chronicle of friendships and lifestyles in transition. John Milius (Apocalypse Now, Red Dawn) directs and co-scripts with a passion for the ultimate ride and a truthful feel for those turbulent times. Stars Jan-Michael Vincent and William Katt are accomplished surfers; co-lead Gary Busey (Point Break) learned for the role. And the vivid camerawork drops you inside awesome barrels of ocean blue.

  • A proud woman in red draws leers and admiration. A bosomy tobacconist sparks the fantasies of adolescent boys. A mentally challenged uncle takes refuge in a tree and announces: “I want a woman!“ They are among moments and events knit by memory… and a legendary filmmaker in peak form.

    Amarcord, which means “I remember,” is Federico Fellini’s lusty, often funny look at growing-up perhaps not unlike his own. The setting is a village in 1930s Italy. Teen hormones are surging. Family, church and friendship are proving grounds of love and loyalty. Fascism’s rise is just down the street. Sex is around any corner. And life viewed in the local cinema is a touchstone for life lived. The memories, big and small, endure. So does the appeal of this Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award® winner.

  • “My name is Jim, but most people call me... Jim”. And while Blazing Saddles is deliriously funny, most people call it deliriously funnier.

    Filmmaker, star and paddle-ball wiz Mel Brooks goes way out West and way out of his mind with a spiffy spoof set in an 1874 Old West where 1974 Hollywood is just one soundstage away – and where nonstop fun blasts prejudices to the high comedy heavens. Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder, Slim Pickens, Harvey Korman, Madeline Kahn and more join for horseplay and horselaughs, making Blazing Saddles the #6 choice among the American Film Institute’s Top-100 comedies.

  • When a dazzling American showgirl captures the monocled eye of an imperious European monarch, it’s clear proof opposites attract. And who could be more attractive opposites than luminous Marilyn Monroe and suave Laurence Olivier (who also produced and directed) as The Prince and the Showgirl? 

    He’s Prince Regent of Carpathia, an arrogant stuffed shirt visiting London for the 1911 coronation of King George V. She’s Elsie Marina of Milwaukee, short on social graces but long on common sense, in London as a third-blonde-from-the-left Gaiety Girl. Their liaison is an eye-opener – and it soon gets hazy as to who’s seducing whom. With Olivier’s style, Monroe’s radiance and the wit of Terence Rattigan’s script (adapting his play The Sleeping Prince), your heart and funnybone truly receive the royal treatment.

  • Cary Grant and a stellar cast romp through this classic farce based on Joseph Kesselring’s 1941 Broadway hit and breezily directed by Frank Capra. 

    Frazzled drama critic Mortimer Brewster (Grant) has two aunts (Josephine Hull and Jean Adair) who ply lonely geezers with poisoned libations, one sociopathic brother (Raymond Massey) who looks like Boris Karloff, one bonkers brother (John Alexander) who thinks he’s Teddy Roosevelt, one impatient new bride (Priscilla Lane) - and only one night to make it turn out all right. In this circus’ centre ring is Grant, twisting his face into a clown’s gallery of flabbergasted reactions and transforming his natural athletic grace into a rubber-legged comic ballet. You’ll die laughing.

  • Principal photography is underway on New Line Cinema’s action comedy “Game Night,” starring Jason Bateman (the “Horrible Bosses” films, TV’s “Arrested Development”) and Oscar nominee Rachel McAdams (“Spotlight,” “Dr. Strange”).