Movies

35 titles found


  • Stomping, whomping, stealing, singing, tap-dancing, violating. Derby-topped hooligan Alex (Malcolm McDowell) has a good time – at the tragic expense of others. His journey from amoral punk to brainwashed proper citizen and back again forms the dynamic arc of Stanley Kubrick’s future-shock vision of Anthony Burgess’ novel. 

    Controversial when first released, A Clockwork Orange won New York Film Critics Best Picture and Director awards and earned four Oscar® nominations, including Best Picture. Its power still entices, shocks and holds us in its grasp.

  • A Streetcar Named Desire: The Original Director’s Version is the Elia Kazan/ Tennessee Williams film moviegoers would have seen had not Legion of Decency censorship occurred at the last minute. 

    It features three minutes of previously unseen footage underscoring, among other things, the sexual tension between Blanche DuBois (Vivien Leigh) and Stanley Kowalski (Marlon Brando), and Stella Kowalski’s (Kim Hunter) passion for husband Stanley. Catch all of the classic — nominated for 12 Academy Awards® including Best Picture and winner of 4* — that introduced a new era of filmmaking. Step aboard this Streetcar.

  • Charlton Heston brings a physical and moral presence to his Best Actor Oscar®-winning role of Judah Ben-Hur, a Jewish nobleman in Palestine whose heroic odyssey includes enslavement by the Romans, vengeance against his tormentors during a furious arena chariot race and fateful encounters with Jesus Christ.

    Best Director Oscar® winner William Wyler masterfully grips the reins of an enduring and spellbinding spectacular.

  • Depression-era drifters Clyde Barrow (Warren Beatty) and Bonnie Parker (Faye Dunaway) embark on a life of crime. They crave adventure – and each other. We are unprepared for the cascading violence that follows; we learn they can be hurt – and dread they will be killed.

    The vivid title-role performances get superb support from Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman and Estelle Parsons, 1967 Best Supporting Actress Academy Award® winner. Bonnie and Clyde continually dazzles, thanks to director Arthur Penn, cinematographer Burnett Guffey (winner of the film’s second Oscar®) and editor Dede Allen. Decades later, it’s still a thunderous, thrilling ride.

  • Easy to enter, but much harder to leave, especially if you’re wanted by the Nazis. Such a man is Resistance leader Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid), whose only hope is Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart), a cynical American who sticks his neck out for no one… especially Victor’s wife, Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman), the ex-lover who broke his heart. 

    Ilsa offers herself in exchange for Laszlo’s transport out of the country and bitter Rick must decide what counts more – personal happiness or countless lives hanging in the balance. Winner of three Academy Awards® including Best Picture, Casablanca marks decades as a beloved favourite. No matter how often you’ve seen it, this looks like yet another beginning of a beautiful friendship with an unforgettable classic.

  • "I’m not living with you," Maggie snaps at Brick. “We occupy the same cage, that’s all.” The raw emotions and crackling dialogue of Tennessee Williams’ 1955 Pulitzer Prize-winning play rumble like a thunderstorm in this film version whose fiery performances and grown-up themes made it a box-office hit.

    Paul Newman earned his first Oscar® nomination for his nuanced portrayal of troubled former sports hero Brick. Capturing her second, Elizabeth Taylor makes Maggie the Cat, digging her claws in and holding onto life not as it is , but as she hopes it someday will be, a vivid portrait of passionate loyalty.

  • Assigned to a remote outpost in the 1860s West, Lt. John Dunbar fears the nearby Sioux Indians and expects to fight them. Instead, he befriends them and becomes the man in the middle of a brushfire of tension: the conflict between U.S expansion and Native Americans. 

    Kevin Costner plays Dunbar and makes one of Hollywood’s most impressive directorial debuts with this winner of seven Academy Awards® including Best Picture and Best Director. Battles rage, fates collide, bison thunder across the prairie – the adventure is epic, heroic and stunning.

  • Academy Award winner Bette Davis stars as woman caught between the man she loves and the man whose secrets could destroy her as she plays a life-and-death game of passion and Deception.

    World War II. Music teacher Christine Radcliffe (Davis), who believes that the man she loves, cellist Karel Novak (Paul Henreid), died in the war, has been involved in an affair with her "mentor", composer Alexander Hollenius (Claude Rains). But when Karel returns unexpectedly hoping to marry Christine, Alexander strives to destroy Novak even as he uses the secret of his past with Christine to torment her. Now, as Alexander drives Christine to the brink of murder, will Novak stand by the woman he loves despite everything he learns?

  • Alfred Hitchcock’s screen version of Frederick Knott’s stage hit Dial M for Murder is a tasty blend of elegance and suspense casting Grace Kelly, Ray Milland and Robert Cummings as the points of a romantic triangle. 

    Kelly won the New York Film Critics and National Board of Review Best Actress Awards for this and two other acclaimed 1954 performances. She loves Cummings; her husband Milland plots her murder. But when he dials a Mayfair exchange to set the plot in motion, his right number gets the wrong answer and gleaming scissors become a deadly weapon. Dial “M” for the Master of Suspense at his most stylish.