Movies

46 titles found


  • On a laughter scale, Blake Edwards’s 10, a spicy comedy of manners, morals and mid-life crises, hits the top. It’s a film of many moods, sometimes sexy, sometimes thoughtful, sometimes slapstick – but always on target. That target is 42-year old composer George Webber (Dudley Moore), a man who has everything and who may just chuck it all in an obsessive quest for a beautiful woman (Bo Derek) he glimpses en route to her wedding.

  • Stomping, whomping, stealing, singing, tap-dancing, violating. Derby-topped hooligan Alex (Malcolm McDowell) has a good time – at the tragic expense of others. His journey from amoral punk to brainwashed proper citizen and back again forms the dynamic arc of Stanley Kubrick’s future-shock vision of Anthony Burgess’ novel. 

    Controversial when first released, A Clockwork Orange won New York Film Critics Best Picture and Director awards and earned four Oscar® nominations, including Best Picture. Its power still entices, shocks and holds us in its grasp.

  • In the Watergate Building, lights go on and four burglars are caught in the act. That night triggered revelations that drove a U.S. President from office. Washington reporters Bob Woodward (Robert Redford) and Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) grabbed the story and stayed with it through doubts, denials and discouragement. All the President’s Men is their story. 

    Directed by Alan J. Pakula and based on the Woodward/Bernstein book, the film won four 1976 Academy Awards® (Best Supporting Actor/ Jason Robards, Adaptation Screenplay/William Goldman, Art Direction and Sound). It also explores a working newspaper, where the mission is to get the story — and get it right.

  • Amadeus triumphs as gripping human drama, sumptuous period epic, glorious celebration of the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart — and as the winner of eight 1984 Academy Awards®, including Best Picture (produced by Saul Zaentz), Actor (F.Murray Abraham), Director (Milos Forman) and Adapted Screenplay (Peter Shaffer).

    It’s 1781 and Antonio Salieri (Abraham) is the competent court composer to Emperor Joseph II. When Mozart (Oscar® nominee Tom Hulce) arrives at court, Salieri is horrified to discover that the godlike musical gifts he desires for himself have been bestowed on a bawdy, impish jokester. Mad with envy, he plots to destroy Mozart by any means. Perhaps, even murder.

  • A proud woman in red draws leers and admiration. A bosomy tobacconist sparks the fantasies of adolescent boys. A mentally challenged uncle takes refuge in a tree and announces: “I want a woman!“ They are among moments and events knit by memory… and a legendary filmmaker in peak form.

    Amarcord, which means “I remember,” is Federico Fellini’s lusty, often funny look at growing-up perhaps not unlike his own. The setting is a village in 1930s Italy. Teen hormones are surging. Family, church and friendship are proving grounds of love and loyalty. Fascism’s rise is just down the street. Sex is around any corner. And life viewed in the local cinema is a touchstone for life lived. The memories, big and small, endure. So does the appeal of this Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award® winner.

  • In 1959, Kit (Martin Sheen), who has killed several people, and his new girlfriend Holly (Sissy Spacek), who watched him do it, are adrift in a double fantasy of crime and punishment across South Dakota and Montana. They’re playing make-believe but the bullets and bloodshed are very real. 

    The first of writer/director Terrence Malick’s three landmark films (1978’s Days of Heaven and 1998’s The Thin Red Line are the others) was inspired by a real-life 1958 Midwestern killing spree. Malick imaginatively transforms their story into a provocative study of people alienated from everyday life – but fascinating to us. Beautifully shot and memorably acted, Badlands is a spellbinding journey.

  • No matter what rolled in on the tides of time, California surfing buddies Matt, Jack and Leroy knew they’d stick together. And that they’d be ready when a rare 20 -foot swell hit the coast at last. 

    Big Wednesday celebrates surfing as much as the most dedicated kid who ever waxed a board. It’s also a fascinating 1962-1974 chronicle of friendships and lifestyles in transition. John Milius (Apocalypse Now, Red Dawn) directs and co-scripts with a passion for the ultimate ride and a truthful feel for those turbulent times. Stars Jan-Michael Vincent and William Katt are accomplished surfers; co-lead Gary Busey (Point Break) learned for the role. And the vivid camerawork drops you inside awesome barrels of ocean blue.

  • “My name is Jim, but most people call me... Jim”. And while Blazing Saddles is deliriously funny, most people call it deliriously funnier.

    Filmmaker, star and paddle-ball wiz Mel Brooks goes way out West and way out of his mind with a spiffy spoof set in an 1874 Old West where 1974 Hollywood is just one soundstage away – and where nonstop fun blasts prejudices to the high comedy heavens. Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder, Slim Pickens, Harvey Korman, Madeline Kahn and more join for horseplay and horselaughs, making Blazing Saddles the #6 choice among the American Film Institute’s Top-100 comedies.

  • Chisum showcases John Wayne in the twilight of his remarkable 200+ film career. As John Chisum, a real-life cattle king determined to protect his empire against a land-grabbing developer (Forrest Tucker). 

    Wayne’s no-nonsense persona snugly fits this lively reworking of the events of New Mexico’s 1878 Lincoln County War. Directed in fine sagebrush style by Andrew V. McLaglen and beautifully photographed by William H. Clothier (The Warner Bros. Story), Chisum is the kind of sweeping, brawling Western that made Wayne endure as a star.

  • Abroad on a rest holiday, composer Gustav Aschenbach (Dirk Bogarde) is to all the world reserved and civilized. But when he glimpses someone who inspires him to give way to a secret passion, it foreshadows his doom. Director Luchino Visconti (Rocco and His Brothers, The Damned ) transforms Thomas Mann’s classic novel into “a masterwork of power and beauty” (William Wolf, Cue). 

    Like Aschenbach, Visconti is an artist obsessed: his movies are awash in mood, period detail and seething emotions beneath placid surfaces. Earning its maker a Cannes Film Festival Special 25th- Anniversary Prize, Death in Venice – with a soundtrack feast of Gustav Mahler music and a haunting Bogarde performance – is Visconti at his best.