Movies

46 titles found


  • For $1,000 a day, vacationers can indulge whims at the theme park called Westworld. They can bust up a bar or bust out of jail, drop in on a brothel or get the drop on a gunslinger. It’s all safe: the park’s lifelike androids are programmed never to harm the customers. But not all droids are getting with the program. 

    Michael Crichton (Jurassic Park, Twister) wrote and made his directing debut with this futuristic thriller that heralded moviemaking’s future as the first feature to use digitized images. Richard Benjamin and James Brolin portray pals confronted by a simulated reality turned real. And Yul Brynner is their stalking, spur-jangling nemesis. It’s man vs. machine–in a tomorrow that isn’t big enough for the both of them.

  • This documentary was made three years after Jimi Hendrix's untimely death. The film contains concert footage spanning the Marquee in 1967 to his last UK performance at the third Isle of Wight festival in 1970; along the way we see classic performances at Monterey (1967), Woodstock (1969), Fillmore East (1969/70), and Berkeley (1970).

  • Amadeus triumphs as gripping human drama, sumptuous period epic, glorious celebration of the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart — and as the winner of eight 1984 Academy Awards®, including Best Picture (produced by Saul Zaentz), Actor (F.Murray Abraham), Director (Milos Forman) and Adapted Screenplay (Peter Shaffer).

    It’s 1781 and Antonio Salieri (Abraham) is the competent court composer to Emperor Joseph II. When Mozart (Oscar® nominee Tom Hulce) arrives at court, Salieri is horrified to discover that the godlike musical gifts he desires for himself have been bestowed on a bawdy, impish jokester. Mad with envy, he plots to destroy Mozart by any means. Perhaps, even murder.

  • Celebrate martial arts legend Bruce Lee’s final film. Sent to an exotic island by his government, a spy (Lee) competes in a deadly tournament by day and infiltrates a ruthless crime lord’s illegal drug operation by night. 

    With plot twists, exquisite cinematography and bone – crushing fight scenes choreographed by Lee himself. Enter the Dragon remains cinema’s most influential martial arts action film.

  • They are fast friends and worse foes. One is Billy the Kid (Kris Kristofferson), a law unto himself. The other is the law: Sheriff Pat Garrett (James Coburn), who once rode with Billy. 

    Set to a bristling score by Bob Dylan (who also plays Billy’s sidekick Alias) and with a Who’s Who of iconic Western players, Sam Peckinpah’s saga of one of the West’s great legends is now restored to its intended glory. For the first time since it left the cutting room, the film has the balance of action and character development Peckinpah wanted, a mix of fury and elegy based on the director’s notes and the insights of colleagues. The difference is profound, as different as an untouched target and a bull’s-eye.

  • In 1959, Kit (Martin Sheen), who has killed several people, and his new girlfriend Holly (Sissy Spacek), who watched him do it, are adrift in a double fantasy of crime and punishment across South Dakota and Montana. They’re playing make-believe but the bullets and bloodshed are very real. 

    The first of writer/director Terrence Malick’s three landmark films (1978’s Days of Heaven and 1998’s The Thin Red Line are the others) was inspired by a real-life 1958 Midwestern killing spree. Malick imaginatively transforms their story into a provocative study of people alienated from everyday life – but fascinating to us. Beautifully shot and memorably acted, Badlands is a spellbinding journey.

  • Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty and Ronny Cox play “weekend warriors” who set off in two canoes down a mystery-laden Georgia river – and discover a wilderness of terror. Director John Boorman (Excalibur, Hope and Glory) sets them – and viewers – on the knife-edge of survival. 

    Adapted by James Dickey from his novel and nominated for three Academy Awards® including Best Picture, this “absolutely first-rate piece of moviemaking” (Charles Champlin, Los Angeles Times) draws us in with the irresistible force of a raging current.

  • Bill McKay (Robert Redford), California Democratic candidate for U.S. Senator, a man of integrity and ideals, will now let the great American political machine manipulate him. Because now he’s got to win. 

    The Candidate, directed by Michael Ritchie from an on-target Academy Award – winning Best Original Screenplay (1972) by Jeremy Larner, is all about the packing of today’s office-seeker. Still timely after 40 year, it’s a sharp insider’s view of how admen, press agents, pollsters and media czars converge on election campaigns. Peter Boyle, Melvyn Douglas and Don Porter co-star in one of the wittiest political movies ever made.

  • In this newly remastered Dr. Seuss tale, the Lorax speaks for the trees, which the Once-ler is chopping down as fast as he pleases. 

    Will the Once-ler change his destructive ways and heed the wise warnings of the Lorax? With the help of a young boy and the very last Truffula Tree seed, the Once-ler may still be able to right his wrongdoings.