Movies

22 titles found


  • By any standard , director Sam Peckinah’s film The Wild Bunch, is a powerful tale of hangdog desperados bound by a code of honour, rates as one of the all-time greatest Westerns, perhaps one of the greatest of all films.

    This original Director’s Cut restores it to a complete, pristine condition unseen since its July 1969 theatrical debut. The image is letterboxed, the colour renewed, the stereo soundtrack remixed and reintegrated – all to blood-and thunder effect. Watch William Holden, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan and more great stars saddle up for the roles of a lifetime.

  • The mission is clear. Get in. Get the general. Get out. Commandos charged with freeing a U.S. general from an Alpine fortress should also be told to trust nothing – including the search-and-rescue orders just issued. 

    Richard Burton and Clint Eastwood go Where Eagles Dare in this twisty World War II thriller written by action master Alistair MacLean (The Guns of Navarone, Ice Station Zebra) and directed by Brian G. Hutton (Kelly’s Heroes). Known for fiery dramatic roles, Burton ventures into the realm of movie pyrotechnics with dynamic efficiency. And Eastwood’s cool-fire presence heightens one searing action sequence after another. The film became Eastwood’s then-largest hit and its studio’s #1 moneymaker of the year.

  • Before the night is out, the star witness for an important trial lies dying and Detective Frank Bullitt (Steve McQueen) won’t rest until the shooters – and the kingpin behind them – are nailed. 

    From the opening shot to the closing shootout, Bullitt crackles with authenticity: San Francisco locations, crisp dialogue and to-the-letter police, hospital and morgue procedures. An Oscar® winner for Best Film Editing (1969), this edgy thriller features on of cinema history’s most memorable car chases. Buckle up for the unbeatable action.

  • "They were crack troops skilled in the techniques of unconditional warfare, the soldiers of the Special Forces – and the focus of Hollywood’s first feature film about the Vietnam War: The Green Berets. John Wayne stars in and co-directs this red-white-and-blue depiction of America’s Vietnam effort, based on Robert Moore’s novel. Wayne wrote to President Lyndon Johnson to request military assistance for the film – and got more than enough firepower to create an impressive spectacle.

    Its soldiers fit the tried-and-true mould of earlier Wayne war classics like Back to Bataan and Sands of Iwo Jima. Their heroics are timeless.

  • 2001: A Space Odyssey is a countdown to tomorrow, a road map to human destiny, a quest for the infinite. It is a dazzling, Academy Award®-winning visual achievement, a compelling drama of man vs. Machine, a stunning meld of music and motion. It may be the master-work of director Stanley Kubrick (who co-wrote the screenplay with Arthur C. Clarke)... and it will likely excite, inspire and enthral for generations.

    To begin his voyage into the future, Kubrick visits our prehistoric ape-ancestry past, then leaps millennia (via one of the most mind-blowing jump cuts ever conceived) into colonised space, and ultimately whisks astronaut Bowman (Kier Dullea) into unchartered realms of space, perhaps even into immortality. “Open the pod bay doors, HAL.” Let the awe and mystery of a journey unlike any other begin.

  • His crime: nonconformity. His sentence: the chain gang. Paul Newman plays one of his best-loved roles as Cool Hand Luke, the loner who won’t – or can’t – bend to the arbitrary rules of his captivity. 

    A cast of fine character actors, including George Kennedy in his Oscar® - winning role of dragline and the indelible Jo Van Fleet as Luke’s mother, give Newman solid support. And Strother Martin is the Captain who taunts Luke with the now-legendary line, “What we’ve got here is.. failure to communicate.” No failure here. With rich humour and vibrant storytelling power, Cool Hand Luke succeeds resoundingly.

  • The legend of King Arthur has enchanted generation after generation. His pure, perfect kingdom was shattered because of the tragic passion between Queen Guenevere and the Round Table’s bravest knight Lancelot. Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe shaped that saga into the 1960 musical Camelot.

    Seven years later, the stage hit became a triple Academy Award® -winner with glowing performances by Richard Harris, Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero and a glistening score. This remastered edition delivers a revitalised picture and remixed Dolby Digital sound. Experience anew the melodic romance of that “one brief shining moment” known as Camelot.

  • Depression-era drifters Clyde Barrow (Warren Beatty) and Bonnie Parker (Faye Dunaway) embark on a life of crime. They crave adventure – and each other. We are unprepared for the cascading violence that follows; we learn they can be hurt – and dread they will be killed.

    The vivid title-role performances get superb support from Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman and Estelle Parsons, 1967 Best Supporting Actress Academy Award® winner. Bonnie and Clyde continually dazzles, thanks to director Arthur Penn, cinematographer Burnett Guffey (winner of the film’s second Oscar®) and editor Dede Allen. Decades later, it’s still a thunderous, thrilling ride.

  • They are convicts, psychos, lunkheads, losers – and champs at the box office and in movie lore. Decades after it burst onto the scene, The Dirty Dozen remains a milestone among ensemble action flicks. Lee Marvin portrays a tough-as-nails major volunteered in the Army way to command a squad of misfits on a suicide mission against Nazi brass. 

    Charles Bronson, Jim Brown, John Cassavetes, Trini Lopez, Telly Savalas, Donald Sutherland and Clint Walker are among the 12 jailbirds who will earn their freedom if they survive. And Robert Aldrich (The Longest Yard) directs, blending anti-authority gibes with explosive excitement. Nominated for four Academy Awards® The Dirty Dozen won for Best Sound Effects.

  • Professional photographer Thomas saw nothing. And he saw everything. Enlargements of pictures he secretly took of a romantic couple in the park reveal a murder in progress. Or do they? 

    Winner of 1966 Best Picture and Director Awards from the then-new National Society of Film Critics, Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-up is an influential, stylish study of paranoid intrigue and disorientation. It is also a time capsule of mod London, a mindscape of the era’s fashions, free love, parties, music (Herbie Hancock wrote the score and The Yardbirds riff at a club) and hip langour. David Hemmings plays the jaded photographer enlivened by the mystery in his photos. Vanessa Redgrave is the elusive woman pictured in them. And the enigma of what you see, what you don’t see and what the camera sees is yours to solve.