Movies

19 titles found


  • As a psychotic thug devoted to his hard-boiled ma, James Cagney - older, scarier and just as electrifying - gives a performance to match his work in The Public Enemy as White Heat's cold-blooded Cody Jarrett. Bracingly directed by Raoul Walsh, this fast-paced thriller tracing Jarrett's violent life in and out of jail is also a harrowing character study. Jarrett is a psychological time bomb ruled by impulse. he murders a wounded accomplice and revels in the act. He neglects his sultry wife (Virginia Mayo) and adores his doting mother. It is among the most vivid screen performances of Cagney's career, and the excitement it generates will put you on top of the world!

  • Strolling along 5th Avenue or going on the bum as A Couple of Swells, Judy Garland and Fred Astaire lead a parade of music (17 Irving Berlin tunes and an Academy Award® winning adaptation score arranged by Johnny Green and Roger Edens) and gotta-dance fun (including Astaire’s Drum Crazy) in this neverending delight co-starring Ann Miller (performing a knockout Shakin’ the Blues Away) and Peter Lawford (gamely crooning The Fella with the Umbrella with Garland). Don’t let this colourful Easter Parade pass you by!

  • Academy Award winner Bette Davis stars as woman caught between the man she loves and the man whose secrets could destroy her as she plays a life-and-death game of passion and Deception.

    World War II. Music teacher Christine Radcliffe (Davis), who believes that the man she loves, cellist Karel Novak (Paul Henreid), died in the war, has been involved in an affair with her "mentor", composer Alexander Hollenius (Claude Rains). But when Karel returns unexpectedly hoping to marry Christine, Alexander strives to destroy Novak even as he uses the secret of his past with Christine to torment her. Now, as Alexander drives Christine to the brink of murder, will Novak stand by the woman he loves despite everything he learns?

  • The sign outside the roadside diner says “Man Wanted.” Drifter Frank Chambers knows the sign has more than one meaning when he eyes pouty, luminous Cora, the much-younger bride of the diner’s proprietor. 

    Based on the same-titled novel by James M. Cain (Double Indemnity, Mildred Pierce), this quintessential film-noir classic combines studio-system gloss with Cain’s hard-bitten tale of murderous attractions. John Garfield and Lana Turner give career-benchmark performances as Frank and Cora, illicit lovers who botch a first attempt to bump off Cora’s hubby, pull it off, betray each other at trial and yet wriggle free. But their volatile tale does not end there. As the film’s metaphorical title indicates, fate is sure to ring again.

  • Supplies are dwindling. Troops are hopelessly outnumbered. But even in defeat there is victory. The defenders of the Philippines— including PT-boat skippers John Brickley (Robert Montgomery) and Rusty Ryan (John Wayne)—will give the U.S. war effort time to regroup after the devastation of Pearl Harbor. 

    Director John Ford’s World War II tale knows its battle-scarred topic first-hand. Montgomery was himself a Pacific PT-boat commander and a valorous Bronze Star recipient. Ford filmed the Academy Award®- winning* documentary Battle of Midway. And Wayne creates a portrait of patriotic resolve as only he can. They Were Expendable salutes all who expended themselves during some of the war’s bleakest hours.

  • What Veda wants, her mother - Mildred Pierce - provides. Even if Mildred must end her middle-class marriage, climb atop the male-dominated business world and marry a wealthy man she doesn't love. "I'll do anything," Mildred says in explaining her love for her daughter. But does anything include murder? 

    From a novel by James M. Cain (The Postman Always Rings Twice, Double Indemnity), Mildred Pierce is a classy murder mystery, a stylish film nor told from a women's point of view. Joan Crawford's Mildred ended a two-year career slump, earned her a Best Actress Academy Award® and revitalized her career. Just when you think you got this nominee for five other Oscars including Best Picture figured out, along comes a shocking twist ending!

  • Judy Garland stars in a timeless tale of family, captured with warmth and emotion by director Vincente Minnelli. 

    The enduring popularity of Meet Me in St. Louis comes from a terrific blend of music, romance and humour. Starring Judy Garland, together with Margaret O’Brien (awarded a special Oscar® as 1944’s outstanding child actress) and Mary Astor, and featuring the musical classics Meet Me in St. Louis, Louis, The Trolley Song and Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.

  • Cary Grant and a stellar cast romp through this classic farce based on Joseph Kesselring’s 1941 Broadway hit and breezily directed by Frank Capra. 

    Frazzled drama critic Mortimer Brewster (Grant) has two aunts (Josephine Hull and Jean Adair) who ply lonely geezers with poisoned libations, one sociopathic brother (Raymond Massey) who looks like Boris Karloff, one bonkers brother (John Alexander) who thinks he’s Teddy Roosevelt, one impatient new bride (Priscilla Lane) - and only one night to make it turn out all right. In this circus’ centre ring is Grant, twisting his face into a clown’s gallery of flabbergasted reactions and transforming his natural athletic grace into a rubber-legged comic ballet. You’ll die laughing.

  • Bette Davis and Paul Lukas star in this multiple Academy Award-nominated drama based on Lillian Hellman's daring play as adapted by the acclaimed Dashiell Hammett. 

    As war threatens 1930s Europe, tireless anti-fascist crusader Kurt Muller (Lukas) keeps his underground activities a secret from his wife's (Davis) Washington, D.C., society mother and the other guests at her house, but a Rumanian aristocrat blackmails him, forcing Muller to kill him and flee back to Europe. Many critics hail Lukas's performance as one of the greatest in film history. He won an Academy Award for Best Actor, and the film was nominated for Best Picture (losing only to Casablanca), Best Screenplay, Best Supporting Actress (Lucile Watson), and Best Writing, Screenplay.