Movies

34 titles found


  • Before she was Wonder Woman, she was Diana, princess of the Amazons, raised on a sheltered island paradise and trained to be an unconquerable warrior.

  • Something huge is on the horizon. Hogarth Hughes just rescued an enormous robot that fell from the stars to Earth. Now young Hogarth has one very big friend and an even bigger problem: How do you keep at 50-foot-tall, steel-eating (junkyard cars are especially tasty) giant a secret? 

    It’s even harder when a nosy government agent arrives in town to hunt down the ‘alien invader’ and the combined land, sea and air might of the US military is sent to demolish the giant. The result: an incredible adventure that’s part metal, part magic, all heart.

  • Assigned to a remote outpost in the 1860s West, Lt. John Dunbar fears the nearby Sioux Indians and expects to fight them. Instead, he befriends them and becomes the man in the middle of a brushfire of tension: the conflict between U.S expansion and Native Americans. 

    Kevin Costner plays Dunbar and makes one of Hollywood’s most impressive directorial debuts with this winner of seven Academy Awards® including Best Picture and Best Director. Battles rage, fates collide, bison thunder across the prairie – the adventure is epic, heroic and stunning.

  • From Nicholas Pileggi’s true-life bestseller Wiseguy, Goodfellas explores the criminal life like no other movie. Directed and co-written by Martin Scorsese, it was judged 1990's Best Picture by the New York, Los Angeles and National Societies of Film Critics and named to the American Film Institute’s Top-100 American Film List.

    Electrical performances abound, and from a standout cast that includes Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Lorraine Bracco and Paul Sorvino, Joe Pesci walked off with the Best Supporting Actor Academy Award®. It “bristles with passion, wit and style” and endures as “an American classic” (Peter Travers, Rolling Stone).

  • Steven Spielberg’s film Empire of the Sun is an inspiring, action-packed epic of a small boy is a great war. That boy is Jim Graham, a young Briton whose unconquerable spirit soars high and free above the harsh confines of a Japanese internment camp during World War II. Through his eyes we see the fascination and horror of war. And we see a child’s hold onto childhood weaken as his struggle to survive grows fiercer. 

    Based on J. G. Ballard’s memorable bestseller, this first major Hollywood studio production ever to shoot is the People’s Republic of China earned 1987 National Board of Review awards for Best Picture and Director, as well as a special citation for Outstanding Juvenile Performance for Christian Bale as Jim.

  • The Color Purple: Celie. “Mr.” Sofia. Nettie. Shug. The unforgettable characters of Alice Walker’s Pulitzer Prize novel brighten the screen in this rhapsodically cinematic adaptation directed by Steven Spielberg. 

    At the story’s centre is Celie (Whoopi Goldberg in her movie debut), whose search for fulfilment in a world closed to her becomes a triumph of cruelty overcome by love, of pain eclipsed by joy. Acting and filmmaking honours all came to The Color Purple. But its greatest honour is the lasting embrace of movie fans everywhere.

  • When free-spirited petty crook Randle P. McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) arrives at the state mental hospital, his contagious sense of disorder jolts the routine. He’s on one side of a brewing war, soft-spoken, coolly monstrous Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) on the other. 

    At stake is the fate of every patient on the ward. This electrifying adaptation of Ken Kesey’s bestseller swept all five major 1975 Academy Awards®: Best Picture (produced by Saul Zaentz and Michael Douglas), Actor (Nicholson), Actress (Fletcher), Director (Milos Forman) and Adapted Screenplay (Lawrence Hauben and Bo Goldman). Raucous, searing and with a superb cast that includes Brad Dourif, Danny DeVito and Christopher Lloyd in his film debut, it soars.

  • Stomping, whomping, stealing, singing, tap-dancing, violating. Derby-topped hooligan Alex (Malcolm McDowell) has a good time – at the tragic expense of others. His journey from amoral punk to brainwashed proper citizen and back again forms the dynamic arc of Stanley Kubrick’s future-shock vision of Anthony Burgess’ novel. 

    Controversial when first released, A Clockwork Orange won New York Film Critics Best Picture and Director awards and earned four Oscar® nominations, including Best Picture. Its power still entices, shocks and holds us in its grasp.

  • Depression-era drifters Clyde Barrow (Warren Beatty) and Bonnie Parker (Faye Dunaway) embark on a life of crime. They crave adventure – and each other. We are unprepared for the cascading violence that follows; we learn they can be hurt – and dread they will be killed.

    The vivid title-role performances get superb support from Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman and Estelle Parsons, 1967 Best Supporting Actress Academy Award® winner. Bonnie and Clyde continually dazzles, thanks to director Arthur Penn, cinematographer Burnett Guffey (winner of the film’s second Oscar®) and editor Dede Allen. Decades later, it’s still a thunderous, thrilling ride.

  • Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton are ideal as malevolent marrieds Martha and George in first-time film director Mike Nicholsʼ searing film of Edward Albeeʼs groundbreaking Whoʼs Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    Taylor won her second Academy Award® (and New York Film Critics, National Board of Review and British Film Academy Best Actress Awards). Burton matches her as her emotionally spent spouse. And George Segal and Best Supporting Actress Oscar® winner Sandy Dennis score as another couple straying into their destructive path. The movie won a total of five Academy Awards® and remains a taboo-toppling landmark over 40 years later.